Skip to main content

Breathing into the space You Create


It was once said, “A yogi measures the span of life by the number of breaths, not by the number of years...” ~ Swami Sivananda. Time seems to have an opportune way of letting us know that relationships and circumstances tend to be temporary and at the peak of its chaotic perfection in the moment. But... the Universe has an auspicious way of reminding us that what we are going through, what we are doing, and who we meet along the way is part of plan. I contemplate often on the current state (avastha) of existence, and wonder if everything we say and do is recorded in some cosmic ledger and balanced out with its appropriate counterpart to ensure we are in harmony with the Universe. And the tabulation of every, thought, word, action, habit is measured and vetted throughout the lifetime to allow the vessel to be at its optimal level.

Perhaps, I might be leaning into it just a bit much, because it could also be as simple as, we are here, then we are not. And in choosing to abide to the simplicity of it all, we experience things and attach emotion to those things: joy, grief, love, disappointment, achievement, sadness... Whatever it is we are meant to experience in our existence... we have meaning, each life has a purpose. We do exist, we do analyze, we do feel, and we do act. The conscious acknowledgement and celebration of our existence is a wonderful phenomenon. With every breath that is taken we pay homage to our beings and recognize the innate need to shift energy within the body.
Often, and when I teach, I constantly remind my fellow yogis to “Breath into the space you create.” What this means is finding the breath, acknowledging its importance, and letting it make room to welcome in positivity and clarity. Even if there is just the smallest focus to do so, you will have had a whole-hearted and meaningful breath to carry your intention forward and leave the weight of the world tolerable and light.  

Namaste,
The Working Yogini

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Progressive Renaissance

  I will admit, I have been a bit reluctant crafting wistful thoughts and sharing them, as there has been a looming lack of creativity… this during a time where we have moments of isolation to “work on ourselves.” However, out of this involuntary reflection, I have been developing allowance of just letting things be. That freedom from expectation opened the thought floodgates, “After all of this, as the beginning of something inevitably has an end… how will we all be as a humanity? Will we go back to how we were living with an altered process of doing things? Will we remember how to do the ‘normal’ things? Will we learn to maintain kindness? Will we utilize the lessons learned during this time to infer how we communicate and treat others? Will ‘we’ ever be we again?”          Thoughts transformed into a considerative (yes, I make up words) journey of how humanitarianism has gone through cycles of advancement – or supposedly. Whenever we are shocked to our core, it seems that some lev

Winter Solstice Solitude

     One of the most revered times of the year for peace and internal solace, the Winter Solstice is an interlude to elevate the self through practices of solitude and reflection. A rather colder period of time on the East coast, we turn to methods of increasing warmth and nurturing the body with earthly foods and brews. Finding the beauty and necessity in all seasons, the Winter Solstice reminds us of the need for life to be still, ruminate on the seeds planted, and prepare for their impending fruition. We amplify our intentions and focus on our goals for the future, giving them the positive energy and focus they require to manifest.      Though personal contributions to wellness are encouraged throughout the year, emphasis is even more evident during this time as we are challenged with the elements (being cognizant of geography). The beauty of the snow covered trees and crispness of the air prompt our internal constitutions to complement extra care and attention to our bodies,